Call for Papers: VB2016 Denver

Posted by   Virus Bulletin on   Dec 22, 2015

VB seeks submissions for the 26th Virus Bulletin Conference.

Virus Bulletin is seeking submissions from those wishing to present papers at VB2016, which will take place 5 to 7 October 2016 at the Hyatt Regency Denver Hotel in Denver, Colorado, USA.

Originally started as an annual gathering of anti-virus experts, the VB conference has since evolved to become one of the world's leading security conferences, covering a broad range of topics in the realm of IT security. It is also one of the longest-running security conferences, and will celebrate its 26th edition in 2016.

The conference will include a programme of 30-minute presentations running in two concurrent streams. Presentations vary from the very technical to those aimed at a broader security audience. As in previous years, submissions are invited on topics that fall into any of the following areas:

  • Malware & botnets
  • Anti-malware tools & methods
  • Mobile devices
  • Spam & social networks
  • Hacking & vulnerabilities
  • Network security

A more detailed list of topics, suggestions and the full call for papers can be found here.

The deadline for submission of proposals is Friday 18 March 2016. Abstracts should be submitted via the online abstract submission system.

Posted on 22 December 2015 by Martijn Grooten

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