Throwback Thursday: A View from the Lab

Posted by   Virus Bulletin on   Dec 3, 2015

This Throwback Thursday, VB heads back to 1997 with 'A View from the Lab'.

According to its website, the AV-TEST Institute currently registers over 390,000 new malicious programs every day. Back in mid-1997 though, new viruses and variants were appearing at a rate of over 250 per month, and according to Dr Solomon's Software virus researcher Peter Morley, "Any organization which cannot process 300 viruses per month in times of stress, has no chance of keeping in the game."

Peter, who, along with a couple of colleagues, was responsible for processing the incoming viruses at Dr Solomon's Software, split anti-virus organisations into three categories: category A, which processed nearly every virus; category B, which tried to process every virus but failed; and category C, which accepted that they could not process every new virus, and which advocated alternative strategies.

In an opinionated feature article, Peter explained why he held the term 'WildList' in some disdain, and offered advice to corporate IT managers wishing to select one of two or three vendors.

Read Peter's feature here in HTML-format, or download it here as a PDF.

Posted on 03 December 2015 by Helen Martin

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