Weekend round-up

Posted by   Virus Bulletin on   Jan 12, 2004

Narrowband blues, 2004 predictions, VeriSign scuttles Symantec, Dloader/Xombie

It's been a busy few days as 2004 starts to get into full swing. VB has a roundup of the weekend's virus news:

Tech news website Internet News is running an article on Microsoft's Narrowband Security Hurdle, in which Christopher Budd, security program manager with Microsoft's security response center, describes trying to convince dial-up users to download large patches as an 'intractable engineering problem'. Microsoft's provision of a Blaster removal tool - a first for the company - is also discussed, by Internet News.

Meanwhile, InfoWorld quotes Computer Associates' Ian Hameroff and others in a Nostradamus-esque article entitled Engaging in worm warfare, which carries predictions for security over the coming year.

A CNet news item reports that Symantec blames VeriSign for Norton Antivirus's recent testudinate performance and system-hanging crashes - in the words of Symantec: "after January 7th your computer slows down and Microsoft Word and Excel will not start". Oops.

And finally, there has been a spate of articles on Downloader-DJ, a.k.a. Troj/Dloader-L, a.k.a. Trojan.Xombe - a Trojan masquerading as an update to Windows XP.

Posted on 12 January 2004 by Virus Bulletin

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