As complex as Euler's formula

Posted by   Virus Bulletin on   Jun 5, 2002

IT news website Slashdot's report of Simile's cross-platform capabilities was met with the usual host of ill-informed, biased and naïve comments from users of the site.

IT news website Slashdot's report of Simile's cross-platform capabilities was met with the usual host of ill-informed, biased and naïve comments from users of the site, along with some well thought out gems - the most notable being one Alan Solomon's compelling response to the old chestnut 'do AV companies write viruses?'.

Simile's obfuscation was worthy of detailed analysis in the May 2002 issue of VB [pdf | html], and its new-found ability to infect both ELF and PE executables will be the focus of an analysis in the forthcoming issue (click here to find out how to get a copy). In the meantime, whet your appetite with Symantec's description of {Win32/Linux}/Simile.

Posted on 05 June 2002 by Virus Bulletin

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