Shakira cynicism

Posted by   Virus Bulletin on   Jun 7, 2002

As reports begin to appear of the latest VBSWG variant climbing prevalence tables, VB has received a particularly relevant comment from sys-admin Scott Francis.

As reports begin to appear of the latest VBSWG variant climbing prevalence tables, VB has received a particularly relevant comment from sys-admin Scott Francis.

Starting with a brief rant about companies that produce software with glaringly exploitable holes in them, the comment ends: "Viruses would cease to be a problem if users would stop propagating them. A virus that is not spread is not a threat."

Perhaps the industry is too quick to condemn virus writers while not quick enough to denounce home users who consider their internet security to be someone else's concern, while relying on their often outdated AV software to protect them from their own ignorance.

Posted on 07 June 2002 by Virus Bulletin

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