Retail Therapy

Posted by   Virus Bulletin on   Aug 1, 2002

Symantec has been on a blow-out shopping spree...

Symantec has been on a blow-out shopping spree. Perhaps it was its purchase of Mountain Wave earlier this year that put the company in the mood for splashing out - not content with just the one purchase, Symantec has snapped up three more companies in an impressive bout of spending. Hot on the heels of reporting a 39 per cent growth in revenue in the first fiscal quarter, it was announced last month that Symantec was the proud new owner of: Recourse Technologies, whose main business is the provision of intrusion detection systems; managed security services provider Riptech, Inc.; and SecurityFocus, provider of threat alerts and host of the highly regarded BugTraq vulnerability mailing list. The company spent $135 million on Recourse Technologies, $145 million on Riptech, and SecurityFocus set the company back a mere $75 million.

In the AV world, response to the news has been varied, some voicing concern over the monopoly-forming tendencies displayed by Symantec, while many have predicted the demise of the BugTraq list (and coinciding with the announcement was the opening of a new full disclosure list, imaginatively named 'Full Disclosure'). However, support for SecurityFocus co-founder Elias Levy and his team has not been in short supply, and sources at Symantec have claimed that BugTraq subscriptions have continued to rise since the acquisition.

While statements from the companies have attempted to allay any fears of changes to the character of the BugTraq mailing list, we will have to wait until the dust has settled to find out whether such fears were well founded, as well as what impact Symantec's purchases will have on the larger picture. With NAI having increased its exchange offer for outstanding publicly held shares of McAfee.com by 15.5%, could this be the start of an empire-expanding battle between the bigger players in the security market?

Posted on 01 August 2002 by Virus Bulletin

 Tags

twitter.png
fb.png
linkedin.png
hackernews.png
reddit.png

 

Latest posts:

VB2018 paper: From Hacking Team to hacked team to…?

Today we publish the VB2018 paper and video by ESET researcher Filip Kafka, who looked at the new malware by Hacking Team, after the company had recovered from the 2015 breach.

The spam that is hardest to block is often the most damaging

We see a lot of spam in the VBSpam test lab, and we also see how well such emails are being blocked by email security products. Worryingly, it is often the emails with a malicious attachment or a phishing link that are most likely to be missed.

Throwback Thursday: We're all doomed

Mydoom turns 15 this month, and is still being seen in email attachments. This Throwback Thursday we look back to March 2004, when Gabor Szappanos tracked the rise of W32/Mydoom.

VB2019 call for papers - now open!

Have you analysed a new online threat? Do you know a new way to defend against such threats? Are you tasked with securing systems and fending off attacks? The call for papers for VB2019 is now open and we want to hear from you!

VB2018 paper: Unpacking the packed unpacker: reversing an Android anti-analysis library

Today, we publish a VB2018 paper by Google researcher Maddie Stone in which she looks at one of the most interesting anti-analysis native libraries in the Android ecosystem. We also release the recording of Maddie's presentation.

We have placed cookies on your device in order to improve the functionality of this site, as outlined in our cookies policy. However, you may delete and block all cookies from this site and your use of the site will be unaffected. By continuing to browse this site, you are agreeing to Virus Bulletin's use of data as outlined in our privacy policy.