Bring on the DEET

Posted by   Virus Bulletin on   Sep 3, 2002

The latest award for the most tenuous product-pushing story goes to BitDefender, whose marketeers claim a 'mosquito-borne disease could easily become a computer infection.'

The latest award for the most tenuous product-pushing story goes to BitDefender, whose marketeers have seen fit to warn the world about the vague possibility that our computer systems might fall victim to 'the world's most publicized subject today'. (No, not violence in the Gaza Strip, nor flooding in central Europe and China, nor the Kashmir dispute.) According to BitDefender, the West Nile virus might be about to spread to our computer systems: Mihai Radu, Communications Manager at BitDefender arns, 'The mosquito-borne disease could easily become a computer infection.' [Note, VB does not recommend application of DEET to your hard drive.]

In fact, BD's argument is that, because 'West Nile virus' has become one of the top search terms on the Internet, there is a significant likelihood that virus writers will exploit the high level of interest in the subject. Mihai Radu says 'Experience [has] proved that any subject important enough to represent a story for CNN or other important media at national or international level, triggers a quick-spreading computer virus, conjectured by that story.' So, just to clarify, that's any subject reported by CNN or other international news organizations will trigger a computer virus ? Happily, we may rest assured that BitDefender's experts are working on a solution to protect users against potential malicious code related to the West Nile virus. Let's hope they have their eye on CNN for all the other breaking news stories.

Posted on 03 September 2002 by Virus Bulletin

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