Moth-eaten software...

Posted by   Virus Bulletin on   Oct 22, 2002

A warning issued by Israeli security firm GreyMagic Software last month revealed a total of nine vulnerabilities in IE 5.5 and 6.0, all concerning object caching.

A warning issued by Israeli security firm GreyMagic Software last month revealed a total of nine vulnerabilities in IE 5.5 and 6.0, all concerning object caching. At the time of writing, Microsoft has not responded with new patches. Meanwhile, security consultancy PivX Solutions lists a running total of 32 unpatched vulnerabilities (http://www.pivx.com/larholm/unpatched/). As ever, though, the problem doesn't stop once patches are provided. A recent poll on the Virus Bulletin website asked visitors whether they update their systems frequently with the latest security patches. One would like to assume that visitors to VB's website are at least a little interested in securing their PCs. While 69% said yes, 31% of participants said they do not regularly apply security patches to their systems.

Posted on 22 October 2002 by Virus Bulletin

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