Writer of virus trio in court

Posted by   Virus Bulletin on   Nov 13, 2002

A British man has appeared in court charged with the creation and distribution of a trio of mass-mailing viruses: Gokar, Redesi and Admirer.

A British man has appeared in court charged with the creation and distribution of a trio of mass-mailing viruses: Gokar, Redesi and Admirer.

21-year-old Simon Vallor, of North Wales, was arrested in February this year following intellegence from the FBI and also faces charges of possession of child pornography.

The sentencing last year of Kournikova author Jan de Wit and earlier this year of Melissa author David Smith both elicited a strong response from within the AV community, with calls for tougher sentencing for creators of malware. With all three of Vallor's virus creations having had a lower profile in the media, VB awaits news of Vallor's sentencing with interest:

Update: On 21 January 2003 Simon Vallor was sentenced at London's Southwark Crown Court to two years imprisonment.



Posted on 13 November 2002 by Virus Bulletin

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