A Happy New Year

Posted by   Virus Bulletin on   Jan 2, 2003

In a cheery end-of-year message, mi2g has made ten security predictions for 2003.

In a cheery end-of-year message, mi2g has made ten security predictions for 2003. Amongst predictions that global political tensions and conflict will be mirrored in the digital world are forecasts that the malware threat will continue to escalate in 2003 and that, while the number of new viruses and worms released may fall, the damage caused by a small number of 'killer' viruses or worms will run to billions of dollars. The company anticipates that the proliferation of broadband will lead to more frequent attacks on small-to-medium sized entities and home users, and that Eastern Europe will continue to be 'the centre for virus and malicious code development'.

But will 2003 be a year free from the over-used publicity technique of scaremongering? Already it appears not.

Posted on 02 January 2003 by Virus Bulletin

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