Virus writers get a helping hand

Posted by   Virus Bulletin on   Jan 23, 2003

Two organizations send viruses to mailing list subscribers...

Despite the recent conviction of Welsh Wiccan Simon Vallor, for writing and distributing three mass-mailing viruses, virus writers seem to have been given a helping hand recently when it comes to distributing their creations.

Those with good memories will remember W95/Marburg, which was included on 'the master CD of the popular MGM/EA PC CD-ROM game "Wargames"', and subsequently on various PC magazine cover-disks. Kaspersky 's mailing list was 'hijacked' a couple of months ago, resulting in subscribers to the list being sent a message containing Braid.

Sobering stuff, especially in today's rather litigious environment.

In the last week, two organizations have managed similar stunts. Norway's Data Inspectorate, a government agency that provides security information to subscribers, claims its external email server was infected by the Funlove virus, resulting in 1,700 subscribers receiving a copy. One would hope that people with enough nous to subscribe themselves to a security mailing list would be adequately protected.

Sadly, the same cannot be assumed for subscribers to online betting firm bet365's mailing list. Due to a technical oversight of the security kind, subscribers were sent a copy of W32/Lirva. According to The Register, 'bet365 has an active customer base of 10,000 people. Figures for the number of people on the list, much less the numbers who received the Avril [Lirva] worm last night, are unclear.'

As an aside, a CNET analysis of one of Simon Vallor's viruses, Redesi, is somewhat bafflingly presented on a web page entitled: 'Redesi - Software Reviews' - but then we never liked their 'reviews' anyway...

Posted on 23 Jan 2003 by Virus Bulletin

 Tags

twitter.png
fb.png
linkedin.png
googleplus.png
reddit.png

 

Latest posts:

Throwback Thursday: Giving the EICAR test file some teeth

The 68-byte EICAR test file plays as important a role today as it did 19 years ago. In this week's Throwback Thursday we look back at a VB99 conference paper in which Randy Abrams described how this 'miracle tool' worked and how it could be used.

XMRig used in new macOS cryptominer

A new piece of cryptocurrency-mining malware on macOS has been found to use the popular XMRig miner.

Tendency for DDoS attacks to become less volumetric fits in a wider trend

CDN provider Cloudflare reports an increase in DDoS attacks targeting layer 7 and focusing on exhausting server resources rather than sending large volumes of data. This fits in a wider trend.

Turkish Twitter users targeted with mobile FinFisher spyware

Through fake social media accounts, users were tricked into installing an Android application that was actually a mobile version of the FinFisher spyware.

Hide'n'Seek IoT botnet adds persistence

The Hide'n'Seek IoT botnet has received an update to make its infection persist on infected devices beyond a restart.