Security in the classroom

Posted by   Virus Bulletin on   Apr 1, 2003

Microsoft supporting secure code initiative at University of Leeds

Microsoft seems to be taking security education seriously these days. The software company has pledged support - both financial and in the provision of resources - for a new course which will teach students to write secure code, at the University of Leeds in the UK. Microsoft will provide material based on its 'stride' methodology, which university staff will incorporate into code-writing classes. Unlike previous instances in which Microsoft has pledged support to educational institutions, the staff at Leeds University will be given free rein to use the Microsoft materials and funding to draw up their own curriculum as they see fit. The university has also been granted all intellectual rights and the freedom to distribute/sell its code-writing course materials to other educational institutions.

While some may snigger at the mild irony of Microsoft, a company famed for producing software with security flaws, embarking upon an initiative to promote secure code writing, the move does indicate a much-needed step towards the introduction of security engineering into mainstream computer education. The course will be available from January 2004

Posted on 01 April 2003 by Virus Bulletin

 Tags

twitter.png
fb.png
linkedin.png
googleplus.png
reddit.png

 

Latest posts:

Throwback Thursday: Giving the EICAR test file some teeth

The 68-byte EICAR test file plays as important a role today as it did 19 years ago. In this week's Throwback Thursday we look back at a VB99 conference paper in which Randy Abrams described how this 'miracle tool' worked and how it could be used.

XMRig used in new macOS cryptominer

A new piece of cryptocurrency-mining malware on macOS has been found to use the popular XMRig miner.

Tendency for DDoS attacks to become less volumetric fits in a wider trend

CDN provider Cloudflare reports an increase in DDoS attacks targeting layer 7 and focusing on exhausting server resources rather than sending large volumes of data. This fits in a wider trend.

Turkish Twitter users targeted with mobile FinFisher spyware

Through fake social media accounts, users were tricked into installing an Android application that was actually a mobile version of the FinFisher spyware.

Hide'n'Seek IoT botnet adds persistence

The Hide'n'Seek IoT botnet has received an update to make its infection persist on infected devices beyond a restart.