SAS - the SysAsmin Service?

Posted by   Virus Bulletin on   Dec 18, 2003

Computer security experts prepare to become special constables.

A set of proposals for tackling computer crime has been published by UK Parliamentary lobby group EURIM and the Institute for Public Policy Research. Among other proposals, the paper recommends the introduction of frameworks to facilitate co-operation between industry and law enforcement.

One of the ideas put forward is to bring in members of the private sector to assist law enforcement bodies in areas in which they lack the specialist skills necessary to investigate computer crimes.

Rather than simply assisting with investigations (as computer security experts have done in the past), the paper proposes that specialists from the private sector would be granted an expanded role and become (unpaid) special constables (without the power to arrest). The full paper can be read at http://www.eurim.org/.



Posted on 18 December 2003 by Virus Bulletin

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