Seasonal spamming

Posted by   Virus Bulletin on   Dec 1, 2003

Increase in spam in lead up to holiday season.

A recent study carried out by Corvigo, suggests that the volume of spam in our inboxes showed a marked increase over the lead up to the holiday season. The three-month study showed a 64 per cent rise in the volume of spam since September

Whether this is a seasonal phenomenon or an indication of the overall rise in spam is not clear, but spammers will have to find new topics once the window of opportunity for 'personalised letters to Santa' has passed for another year.

Posted on 01 December 2003 by Virus Bulletin

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