US and UK spam legislation in place

Posted by   Virus Bulletin on   Dec 29, 2003

Anti-spam legislation in place.

While the 'CAN-SPAM Act' is expected to have been signed into US law by 1 January 2004, December 2003 saw the introduction of anti-spam legislation in the UK.

Both sets of legislation have been criticised by members of the anti-spam community for making life easy for spammers - indeed, prolific spammer Alan Ralsky was reported to have said that the passage of the US bill through the House of Representatives 'made [his] day'.

The concerns are that the US legislation fails to make spamming illegal, instead placing the onus on the recipient to opt out. Across the Atlantic, the UK's anti-spam legislation makes some forms of spamming illegal, but a (rather gaping) loophole allows spammers to continue targeting 'business' addresses unabated.

Countries whose legislation has been met with a more positive response include Italy, where spamming is punishable by up to three years in jail, and Australia, where spammers may be fined up to $1.1 million a day. However, the effectiveness of any legislation in reducing the spam problem is likely to be countered while there remains such great disparity in anti-spam legislation across the world.

Posted on 29 December 2003 by Virus Bulletin

 Tags

twitter.png
fb.png
linkedin.png
googleplus.png
reddit.png

 

Latest posts:

VB2018 preview: Unpacking the packed unpacker: reversing an Android anti-analysis library

At VB2018, Google researcher Maddie Stone will present an analysis of the multi-layered 'WeddingCake' anti-analysis library used by many Android malware families.

VB2018 preview: From drive-by download to drive-by mining

At VB2018, Malwarebytes researcher Jérôme Segura will discuss the rise of drive-by cryptocurrency mining, explaining how it works and putting it in the broader context of changes in the cybercrime landscape.

Red Eyes threat group targets North Korean defectors

A research paper by AhnLab researcher Minseok Cha looks at the activities of the Red Eyes threat group (also known as Group 123 and APT 37), whose targets include North Korean defectors, as well as journalists and human rights defenders focused on…

VB announces Threat Intelligence Summit to take place during VB2018

We are very excited to announce a special summit, as part of VB2018, that will be dedicated to all aspects of threat intelligence.

VB2018 Small Talk: An industry approach for unwanted software criteria and clean requirements

An industry approach for defining and detecting unwanted software to be presented and discussed at the Virus Bulletin conference.

We have placed cookies on your device in order to improve the functionality of this site, as outlined in our cookies policy. However, you may delete and block all cookies from this site and your use of the site will be unaffected. By continuing to browse this site, you are agreeing to Virus Bulletin's use of data as outlined in our privacy policy.