US and UK spam legislation in place

Posted by   Virus Bulletin on   Dec 29, 2003

Anti-spam legislation in place.

While the 'CAN-SPAM Act' is expected to have been signed into US law by 1 January 2004, December 2003 saw the introduction of anti-spam legislation in the UK.

Both sets of legislation have been criticised by members of the anti-spam community for making life easy for spammers - indeed, prolific spammer Alan Ralsky was reported to have said that the passage of the US bill through the House of Representatives 'made [his] day'.

The concerns are that the US legislation fails to make spamming illegal, instead placing the onus on the recipient to opt out. Across the Atlantic, the UK's anti-spam legislation makes some forms of spamming illegal, but a (rather gaping) loophole allows spammers to continue targeting 'business' addresses unabated.

Countries whose legislation has been met with a more positive response include Italy, where spamming is punishable by up to three years in jail, and Australia, where spammers may be fined up to $1.1 million a day. However, the effectiveness of any legislation in reducing the spam problem is likely to be countered while there remains such great disparity in anti-spam legislation across the world.

Posted on 29 December 2003 by Virus Bulletin

 Tags

twitter.png
fb.png
linkedin.png
googleplus.png
reddit.png

 

Latest posts:

Throwback Thursday: Giving the EICAR test file some teeth

The 68-byte EICAR test file plays as important a role today as it did 19 years ago. In this week's Throwback Thursday we look back at a VB99 conference paper in which Randy Abrams described how this 'miracle tool' worked and how it could be used.

XMRig used in new macOS cryptominer

A new piece of cryptocurrency-mining malware on macOS has been found to use the popular XMRig miner.

Tendency for DDoS attacks to become less volumetric fits in a wider trend

CDN provider Cloudflare reports an increase in DDoS attacks targeting layer 7 and focusing on exhausting server resources rather than sending large volumes of data. This fits in a wider trend.

Turkish Twitter users targeted with mobile FinFisher spyware

Through fake social media accounts, users were tricked into installing an Android application that was actually a mobile version of the FinFisher spyware.

Hide'n'Seek IoT botnet adds persistence

The Hide'n'Seek IoT botnet has received an update to make its infection persist on infected devices beyond a restart.