New OpenOffice proof-of-concept widely noted

Posted by   Virus Bulletin on   May 23, 2007

Odd payload, not spreading danger, brings attention to cross-platform worm.

A new proof-of-concept malware exploiting the OpenOffice document format has made headlines across the world, despite little chance of affecting users in the wild. The worm, dubbed SB/BadBunny-A by Sophos, has gathered wide media coverage thanks to its strange payload, a downloaded pornographic image of a man dressed in a furry rabbit costume.

The free, open-source OpenOffice suite, backed by Sun Microsystems, includes a macro language called StarBasic, which the worm uses to drop its payloads and spread. Several attempts at writing malware for OpenOffice have been seen in the past, but this is thought to be the first which is capable of spreading if run on different operating systems.

It is designed to act differently under Mac, Linux and Windows to ensure it can still operate in each environment, dropping files written in Ruby, Perl or JavaScript and manipulating popular chat systems. It also attempts to attack the websites of several anti-virus companies.

Like many proof-of-concept malware attempts, the worm is thought to have been submitted by its creators and is not thought to have been seen by anyone outside a virus lab. Commentary on the discovery can be found at Sophos here and here, with more technical analysis here.

Posted on 23 May 2007 by Virus Bulletin

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