Phishing techniques and technology revealed

Posted by   Virus Bulletin on   May 11, 2007

Serious software used to analyse phished data, and a phisher talks.

Some insights into the workings of phishing scams were revealed this week, as a sophisticated tool designed to process data gathered by LdPinch trojans was discovered and analysed, and a security watcher probed the mind of a young phisher in an online conversation, published on his blog.

The LdPinch trojan gathers large amounts of information from infected systems, the exact type of data reaped depending on the variant. Researchers at F-Secure followed the trail of information issuing from an infected machine to its drop site, where it is stored in encrypted files which include details of the date of capture and the originating system. A highly professional graphical tool is then used to sort and parse the data for use in fraud and identity theft.

F-Secure released information on the tool, discovered in collaboration with Sunbelt Software and thought to have been developed by Russians, on its malware blog here. Screenshots of the tool in use are included.

Panda Labs also have some interesting analysis, and screenshots, of a front-end GUI tool, in this case for managing and controlling spam-sending botnets; a blog entry on their discoveries is here.

Elsewhere, security company head and Dark Reading blogger Robert Hansen managed to get in touch with a serial phisher, and found some fascinating background on how phishers operate. The 18-year-old he contacted, who goes by the pseudonym 'lithium' and has been phishing since the age of 14, focuses on social-networking sites, uses bespoke software made by freelance developers, gathers around 30,000 gullible victims per day to his spoofed domains, and claims to make $3,00-$4,000 in a single day's phishing - which he only indulges in 3-4 days per week.

A detailed overview of the information discovered can be found at Dark Reading, here, and the full conversation is here.

Posted on 11 May 2007 by Virus Bulletin

twitter.png
fb.png
linkedin.png
googleplus.png
reddit.png

 

Latest posts:

Guest Blog: Malicious Scripts Gaining Prevalence in Brazil

In the run up to VB2016, we invited the conference sponsors to write guest posts for our blog. In the second of this series, ESET's Matías Porolli writes about malicious Visual Basic and JavaScript gaining prevalence in Brazil.

Romanian university website compromised to serve Neutrino exploit kit

The website of the Carol Davila University of Medicine and Pharmacy has been compromised to inject a hidden iframe into the site's source code that serves the Neutrino exploit kit and may infect visitors with ransomware.

It's 2016. Can we stop using MD5 in malware analyses?

While there are no actually risks involved in using MD5s in malware analyses, it reinforces bad habits and we should all start using SHA-256 instead.

Throwback Thursday: Holding the Bady

In 2001, ‘Code Red’ caused White House administrators to change the IP address of the official White House website, and even penetrated Microsoft’s own IIS servers.

Paper: The Journey of Evasion Enters Behavioural Phase

A new paper by FireEye researcher Ankit Anubhav provides an overview of evasion techniques applied by recently discovered malware.