Bugs found in Apple's new Windows browser within hours of release

Posted by   Virus Bulletin on   Jun 13, 2007

Safari not so good-y.

A number of security researchers say they found bugs in Apple's brand new web browser Safari for Windows just hours after its public beta release on 11 June.

The only bug to have been independently verified so far was discovered by researcher Thor Larholm and concerns Safari's failure to validate user-supplied strings before passing them as parameters to external URL protocol handlers. The vulnerability could be exploited to execute code on a victim's computer by viewing a malicious web page in the browser.

A more detailed description can be found on Thor Larholm's blog here.

Other bugs reported include a memory corruption error discovered by researcher Aviv Raff, and a total of six bugs claimed to have been found in the space of one afternoon by David Maynor and colleagues at Errata Security. The details can be found on Aviv Raff's blog here and on David Maynor's blog here.

Posted on 13 June 2007 by Virus Bulletin

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