AOL drops Kaspersky for McAfee

Posted by   Virus Bulletin on   Aug 8, 2007

Web giant changes provider of free security software for members.

Giant ISP and web services provider AOL is offering a free, special edition version of McAfee security software to users registered with its network. The offer replaces a previous offering based on Kaspersky technology, which was quietly taken offline several weeks ago.

The customized product, based on McAfee's Internet Security Suite, combines anti-virus and anti-spyware with a firewall and identity theft protection. The AOL Active Virus Shield software, a pared-down version of Kaspersky Internet Security 6, was also made available free of charge, from August of last year.

The new offering is available from AOL's Internet Security Central site here. Some commentary on the switch, from a Yahoo! Tech blogger, is here.

Posted on 08 August 2007 by Virus Bulletin

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