ClamAV taken over by Sourcefire

Posted by   Virus Bulletin on   Aug 20, 2007

Snort maker buys into open-source AV.

Open-source anti-virus product ClamAV has been acquired by Sourcefire, the US-based company behind leading open-source intrusion detection system Snort.

The takeover includes all available copyright and intellectual property relating to the Clam project, although much of the content will have to remain in the public domain, as well as related websites and source code repositories. Five members of the core team of developers working on the Clam project, including founder Tomasz Kojm, will now become employees of Sourcefire.

As with Snort, created by Sourcefire founder Martin Roesch, ClamAV is expected to remain an open-source community product, backed by Sourcefire resources, with a more refined version of the technology rolled into commercial products.

A release from Sourcefire on the acquisition is here, and an FAQ from ClamAV is here.

Posted on 20 August 2007 by Virus Bulletin

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