Adobe acknowledges PDF flaw, issues workaround

Posted by   Virus Bulletin on   Oct 9, 2007

Registry hack provides temporary fix for vulnerability.

Adobe has officially confirmed the vulnerability announced last month by researcher Petko Petkov, which could allow maliciously crafted PDF files to breach security and compromise systems.

Limited details of the flaw were made public and led to widespread concern over the security of the widely used document format. Adobe has responded by posting details of a workaround, involving changes to the Windows registry, and hopes to have a full fix released as an update to affected products by the end of October. No attack exploiting the flaw has yet been reported.

Adobe's announcement, and detailed instructions for the registry workaround, are here

Posted on 09 October 2007 by Virus Bulletin

twitter.png
fb.png
linkedin.png
googleplus.png
reddit.png

 

Latest posts:

VB2018 preview: Unpacking the packed unpacker: reversing an Android anti-analysis library

At VB2018, Google researcher Maddie Stone will present an analysis of the multi-layered 'WeddingCake' anti-analysis library used by many Android malware families.

VB2018 preview: From drive-by download to drive-by mining

At VB2018, Malwarebytes researcher Jérôme Segura will discuss the rise of drive-by cryptocurrency mining, explaining how it works and putting it in the broader context of changes in the cybercrime landscape.

Red Eyes threat group targets North Korean defectors

A research paper by AhnLab researcher Minseok Cha looks at the activities of the Red Eyes threat group (also known as Group 123 and APT 37), whose targets include North Korean defectors, as well as journalists and human rights defenders focused on…

VB announces Threat Intelligence Summit to take place during VB2018

We are very excited to announce a special summit, as part of VB2018, that will be dedicated to all aspects of threat intelligence.

VB2018 Small Talk: An industry approach for unwanted software criteria and clean requirements

An industry approach for defining and detecting unwanted software to be presented and discussed at the Virus Bulletin conference.

We have placed cookies on your device in order to improve the functionality of this site, as outlined in our cookies policy. However, you may delete and block all cookies from this site and your use of the site will be unaffected. By continuing to browse this site, you are agreeing to Virus Bulletin's use of data as outlined in our privacy policy.