Adobe acknowledges PDF flaw, issues workaround

Posted by   Virus Bulletin on   Oct 9, 2007

Registry hack provides temporary fix for vulnerability.

Adobe has officially confirmed the vulnerability announced last month by researcher Petko Petkov, which could allow maliciously crafted PDF files to breach security and compromise systems.

Limited details of the flaw were made public and led to widespread concern over the security of the widely used document format. Adobe has responded by posting details of a workaround, involving changes to the Windows registry, and hopes to have a full fix released as an update to affected products by the end of October. No attack exploiting the flaw has yet been reported.

Adobe's announcement, and detailed instructions for the registry workaround, are here

Posted on 09 October 2007 by Virus Bulletin

twitter.png
fb.png
linkedin.png
googleplus.png
reddit.png

 

Latest posts:

NCSC gives important advice on lateral movement

The UK's National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC) has provided helpful and practical advice on preventing and detecting lateral movement by an attacker within a network.

What kind of people attend Virus Bulletin conferences?

If you are considering submitting a proposal for a talk to VB2018 and you're not familiar with the event, you may find it useful to know what kind of people attend the conference.

Olympic Games target of malware, again

An unattributed malware attack has disrupted some computer systems of the 2018 Winter Olympics. In 1994, a computer virus also targeted the Winter Olympics.

There are lessons to be learned from government websites serving cryptocurrency miners

Thousands of websites, including many sites of government organisations in the UK, the US and Sweden, were recently found to have been serving a cryptocurrency miner. More interesting than the incident itself, though, are the lessons that can be…

We need to continue the debate on the ethics and perils of publishing security research

An article by security researcher Collin Anderson reopens the debate on whether publishing threat analyses is always in the public interest.