McAfee invests in encryption firm

Posted by   Virus Bulletin on   Oct 9, 2007

SafeBoot acquired for $350 million.

McAfee has announced the acquisition of encryption and device control specialist SafeBoot, which produces a range of security products for PCs and mobile devices. The privately-owned firm was bought in a cash deal worth $350 million.

SafeBoot is a well-established company, set up in 1991, with a global customer base. Its product range includes device access control, encryption and authentication solutions for email and network filesharing, as well as disk- and file-based encryption for desktops, laptops, PDA and other mobile devices. The Netherlands-based company boasts five million licensed users from over 4,200 corporate customers, and was recently ranked among the leaders in the Mobile Data Protection field by analyst firm Gartner.

McAfee plans to integrate SafeBoot's technology into its catch-all security management control system, ePolicy Orchestrator (EPO). A full press release on the acquisition is carried on SafeBoot's website here, with further comment in a blog entry from McAfee CEO David DeWalt here.

Posted on 09 October 2007 by Virus Bulletin

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