E-crime unit to get government funding?

Posted by   Virus Bulletin on   Nov 1, 2007

UK government responds to House of Lords call for better policing of the Internet.

The UK government has indicated that it may set up a new national police unit dedicated to tackling computer crime. The hint comes as part of the government's response to a report issued earlier this year by the Science and Technology Committee of the House of Lords, which strongly advised it to take steps to improve the policing of the Internet.

Specifically, the House of Lords report urged the Home Office to provide the necessary funds to kick-start the establishment of the Police Central e-crime Unit (PCeU) - a project driven by members of the Metropolitan Police to create a central coordination point for e-crime reporting. The government responded by saying that it will 'consider the proposals to create a law enforcement unit to tackle crimes involving computers.'

The e-crime unit, run by the Metropolitan Police, would act as a central coordination point for the e-crime divisions of the UK's local police forces, providing training for officers, collating e-crime reports and liaising with the Serious Organised Crime Agency (SOCA). Its remit would cover similar areas to those of the now defunct National High Tech Crime Unit (NHTCU), which was disbanded and absorbed into SOCA in April 2006.

The project has already received financial support from the National Policing Improvement Agency (NPIA), but it has yet to be guaranteed central government funding and will need to turn to private sector backers if the government fails to allocate the necessary funds.

The government's response to the House of Lords report can be read in full here.

Posted on 01 November 2007 by Virus Bulletin

twitter.png
fb.png
linkedin.png
googleplus.png
reddit.png

 

Latest posts:

Necurs pump-and-dump spam campaign pushes obscure cryptocurrency

A Necurs pump-and-dump spam campaign pushing the lesser known Swisscoin botnet is mostly background noise for the Internet.

Alleged author of creepy FruitFly macOS malware arrested

A 28-year old man from Ohio has been arrested on suspicion of having created the mysterious FruitFly malware that targeted macOS and used it to spy on its victims.

The threat and security product landscape in 2017

At the start of the new year, Virus Bulletin looks back at the threats seen in the 2017 and at the security products that are available to help mitigate them.

Spamhaus report shows many botnet controllers look a lot like legitimate servers

Spamhaus's annual report on botnet activity shows that botherders tend to use popular, legitimate hosting providers, domain registrars and top-level domains when setting up command-and-control servers.

Tips on researching tech support scams

As tech support scammers continue to target the computer illiterate through cold calling, VB's Martijn Grooten uses his own experience to share some advice on how to investigate such scams.