Inconvenient content

Posted by   Virus Bulletin on   Nov 28, 2007

Hackers include spammish content into Al Gore's website.

Hackers have managed to break into a website set up to promote Al Gore's film An Inconvenient Truth and include links to drug-selling sites, PCWorld reports. The hackers' aim was to boost the search engine rankings of the websites linked to by creating links to a very popular website. The added content was invisible to regular users, but visible to search engine crawlers, and the hackers must have hoped for their attack to go unnoticed.

According to Adam Thomas, malware researcher at Sunbelt Software, the hackers probably made use of a vulnerability in WordPress, the popular blogging software used for the site's blog. The spammish content, which has since been removed, is reported to have only been found on the blog.

The effects of this attack were limited, but could have been more significant had the hackers decided to include malware rather than links - as happened, for example, on the website of the Bank of India in September. The case demonstrates once again that restricting Internet browsing only to 'trusted' sites is not sufficient to avoid unwanted and malicious content. As always, VB urges both home and business users to ensure that their anti-malware software is up to date.

Posted on 28 November 2007 by Virus Bulletin

twitter.png
fb.png
linkedin.png
googleplus.png
reddit.png

 

Latest posts:

Throwback Thursday: Giving the EICAR test file some teeth

The 68-byte EICAR test file plays as important a role today as it did 19 years ago. In this week's Throwback Thursday we look back at a VB99 conference paper in which Randy Abrams described how this 'miracle tool' worked and how it could be used.

XMRig used in new macOS cryptominer

A new piece of cryptocurrency-mining malware on macOS has been found to use the popular XMRig miner.

Tendency for DDoS attacks to become less volumetric fits in a wider trend

CDN provider Cloudflare reports an increase in DDoS attacks targeting layer 7 and focusing on exhausting server resources rather than sending large volumes of data. This fits in a wider trend.

Turkish Twitter users targeted with mobile FinFisher spyware

Through fake social media accounts, users were tricked into installing an Android application that was actually a mobile version of the FinFisher spyware.

Hide'n'Seek IoT botnet adds persistence

The Hide'n'Seek IoT botnet has received an update to make its infection persist on infected devices beyond a restart.