419 scammers plead guilty in US

Posted by   Virus Bulletin on   Feb 4, 2008

African trio admit attempts to defraud via spam.

Three men, two from Nigeria and a third from Senegal, entered guilty pleas in a Brooklyn, New York, courtroom last week after being deported from the Netherlands to face trial for running a series of '419' spam scams.

Operating in the usual manner for such scams, the trio sent out waves of email promising recipients large amounts of money, on various pretexts; the scammers would then insist on payments for spurious legal fees and other measures required to access the non-existent cash, in some cases making large amounts out of hopeful victims before it became clear that the promised millions would never materialise.

The trio are thought to have made in excess of $1.2 million from the scams. A fourth man is also in the process of deportation to the US after fleeing to Nigeria. All four could face sentences of up to 20 years imprisonment.

More details are in reports at The Register here or SC Magazine here, with comment from Sophos here.

Posted on 04 February 2008 by Virus Bulletin

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