Habbo trojan steals passwords

Posted by   Virus Bulletin on   Feb 21, 2008

Extension decorates your room... with malware.

A trojan has been discovered that masquerades as an extension to social networking site Habbo, formerly known as Habbo Hotel. The trojan, which contains a keylogger, aims to steal site login details.

Users of Habbo, which is popular among teenagers, can play games, make friends and create 'rooms' which they can decorate using virtual furniture. This furniture is purchased with real money - hence the interest of cyber-criminals in stealing usernames and passwords. (The site also made the news last November, when a Dutch teenager was arrested for allegedly stealing €4,000 worth of virtual furniture.)

While third-party extensions can certainly enhance the user's enjoyment of social networking sites, users should be aware that many rogue extensions exist - and should always exercise caution when installing such applications.

More can be found at Websense here.



Posted on 21 February 2008 by Virus Bulletin

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