Microsoft acquires Komoku

Posted by   Virus Bulletin on   Mar 25, 2008

Anti-rootkit software to become part of Forefront and OneCare.

Just before Easter, Microsoft announced it had acquired Komoku, a Maryland-based company that builds anti-rootkit software.

Komoku was founded in 2004 and quickly became one of the leaders in the area of rootkit detection. Among its customers are the American ministries of Homeland Security and Defense. Following the acquisition, the name Komoku will disappear and the software will become part of both Microsoft Forefront and Windows Live OneCare.

Rootkit detection is one of the things Microsoft's security products were falling behind on, Jimmy Kuo admits. "A year ago, I noted our test results were 'not stellar'," he says. "We were lacking VB100 certification, and independent test results placed us 10 to 15 points behind where we hoped to score." Both Forefront and OneCare have since achieved VB100 status and Kuo now looks both to maintain the good test performances of the products and to improve on rootkit detection: "The addition of Komoku, especially its talented core of researchers, will add to our proactive capabilities in detecting zero-day vulnerabilities and improve rootkit detection."

The official statement at Komoku's website can be found here.

Posted on 25 March 2008 by Virus Bulletin

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