Spyware gang sneaks millions from SA government

Posted by   Virus Bulletin on   Jun 12, 2008

32 arrested but South Africa theft scam thought to be ongoing.

An orchestrated series of spyware infiltrations has netted scammers over £12.8 million ($24.7 million) from the South African government, and thefts continue to take place despite the arrests of 32 suspects on 86 separate charges, according to local reports.

Government officials told local news outlet the Mail & Guardian that the sneak thefts, thought to be the work of a syndicate, were first observed in 2005 and have continued, in growing numbers, ever since. Funds have been defrauded from several government departments, often with the help of corrupt government officials used to implant snooping software on departmental systems and networks which are then harvested for sensitive information.

A detailed report on the crime wave is on the Mail & Guardian's website here. More coverage is in the Register here or at Vnunet here.

Posted on 12 June 2008 by Virus Bulletin

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