Symantec to acquire PC Tools

Posted by   Virus Bulletin on   Aug 20, 2008

Industry giant adds spyware specialist to growing portfolio.

Security industry behemoth Symantec has announced the planned acquisition of PC Tools, the Australia-based company behind Spyware Doctor and a range of security, privacy and system-cleaning products.

Symantec plans to close the deal by the end of the year, keeping PC Tools as a separate unit under the corporate umbrella. Financial details of the deal have yet to be released.

PC Tools' flagship Spyware Doctor product has become a regular competitor in VB100 comparatives, along with a standalone anti-virus product. Both have incorporated the VirusBuster engine for anti-virus detection, but this looks likely to change once the takeover is completed. Other popular products in the PC Tools lineup include Registry Mechanic, recently released iAntiVirus for Mac and the ThreatFire proactive defence software.

Details of the acquisition are at Symantec here.

Posted on 20 August 2008 by Virus Bulletin

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