AMTSO members summit covers controversial issues

Posted by   Virus Bulletin on   Oct 16, 2009

Expert body gets to grips with string of difficult subjects.

A meeting of the Anti-Malware Testing Standards Organisation (AMTSO) took place this week, with leading experts from around the world gathering to discuss some of the thorniest issues affecting the accurate testing of security solutions. Among the subjects covered were the appropriate use of the organisation's name and reputation by testers, and the long-running, ever-controversial issue of the creation of new malware samples for testing purposes.

AMTSO The meeting was held in Prague, Czech Republic, and hosted by local security firm AVG. It brought together more than three dozen representatives from many of the world's leading security firms as well as several major testing bodies. During lengthy and occasionally heated debates, the group analysed the progress of the review process instigated by the group with the aim of commenting on the quality of published reports, with particular reference to allowing testers to claim compliance with the official AMTSO principles.

The second day of the meeting saw work proceeding on a number of new papers offering guidelines and advice on testing issues, but the day was dominated by the issue of malware creation, with all angles of the hotly debated topic closely considered as the process of drafting a definitive document on the subject reached its final stages.

Final voting saw the approval of the group's progress on this, along with ratification of a new document on testing network-based solutions to join the growing range of resources made available to testers on the AMTSO website, here.

Comment on the meeting and the issues raised there is available from AMTSO board members Stuart Taylor of Sophos here and David Harley of ESET here.

Posted on 16 October 2009 by Virus Bulletin

twitter.png
fb.png
linkedin.png
googleplus.png
reddit.png

 

Latest posts:

New paper: Does malware based on Spectre exist?

It is likely that, by now, everyone in computer science has at least heard of the Spectre attack, and many excellent explanations of the attack already exist. But what is the likelihood of finding Spectre being exploited on Android smartphones?

More VB2018 partners announced

We are excited to announce several more companies that have partnered with VB2018.

Malware authors' continued use of stolen certificates isn't all bad news

A new malware campaign that uses two stolen code-signing certificates shows that such certificates continue to be popular among malware authors. But there is a positive side to malware authors' use of stolen certificates.

Save the dates: VB2019 to take place 2-4 October 2019

Though the location will remain under wraps for a few more months, we are pleased to announce the dates for VB2019, the 29th Virus Bulletin International Conference.

Necurs update reminds us that the botnet cannot be ignored

The operators of the Necurs botnet, best known for being one of the most prolific spam botnets of the past few years, have pushed out updates to its client, which provide some important lessons about why malware infections matter.

We have placed cookies on your device in order to improve the functionality of this site, as outlined in our cookies policy. However, you may delete and block all cookies from this site and your use of the site will be unaffected. By continuing to browse this site, you are agreeing to Virus Bulletin's use of data as outlined in our privacy policy.