AV-Comparatives publishes malware removal test

Posted by   Virus Bulletin on   Oct 29, 2009

16 products challenged to remove selection of tricky infections.

Independent testing body AV-Comparatives has published its latest set of test results, a comparison of how well products clean and remove infections. The test included 16 different products, many of them the latest 2010 editions.

The test involved a small number of infections chosen for their diversity, all taken from the field via infected systems brought in for repairs. The list of ten samples presented some stiff challenges to the field of competitors, with many struggling to completely remove all traces of infection.

Of the products tested, products from BitDefender, eScan, F-Secure, Kaspersky, Symantec and Microsoft came top of the table with the 'Advanced+' rating, while Alwil's avast!, products from AVG, Avira, ESET, McAfee, Sophos and Trustport followed close behind in the 'Advanced' division. G DATA and Norman solutions were rated 'Standard' and Kingsoft merited only the 'Tested' badge.

Full details of the test procedures and results can be found at the AV-Comparatives website, here.

Posted on 29 October 2009 by Virus Bulletin

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