Botnet rented for online extortion

Posted by   Virus Bulletin on   Jun 16, 2011

Man who threatened World Cup bookmakers with DDoS attack convicted.

A German man who hired a botnet and used it to threaten bookmakers with DDoS attacks during the 2010 FIFA World Cup has been convicted of six counts of computer sabotage by a court in Düsseldorf.

The man hired a Russian botnet for US$65 a day and threatened six bookmakers with DDoS attacks on their sites unless they paid him a ransom of 2,500 euros. Three of the sites ended up paying a combined total of 5,000 euros, while the other three sites all refused to pay the ransom (even after the amount was lowered to a 'friendship price' of 1,000 euros).

The defendant is now sentenced to 34 months in prison and has also been ordered to pay damages of up to 350,000 euros.

DDoS attacks have risen to prominence in recent months after having been used for various political purposes, most notably by the Anonymous group. The European Commission has recently proposed rules that would increase penalties for using botnets and other acts of cybercrime.

More at Deutsche Welle, Germany's international broadcaster, here.

Posted on 16 June 2011 by Virus Bulletin

twitter.png
fb.png
linkedin.png
googleplus.png
reddit.png

 

Latest posts:

VB2018 preview: Wipers in the wild

Today we preview the VB2018 paper by Saher Naumaan (BAE Systems Applied Intelligence) on the use of wipers in APT attacks.

VB2018 preview: IoT botnets

The VB2018 programme is packed with a wide range of security topics featuring speakers from all around the world. Today we preview two of them: one by Qihoo 360 researchers on tracking variants of Mirai and one by researchers from Bitdefender on the…

VB2018: last-minute talks announced

We are excited to announce the final additions to the VB2018 programme in the form of 10 'last-minute' papers covering up-to-the-minute research and hot topics and two more invited talks.

VB2018 preview: Since the hacking of Sony Pictures

At VB2018, AhnLab researcher Minseok Cha will look at activities of the Lazarus Group on the Korean peninsula going back as early as April 2011.

Book review: Click Here to Kill Everybody

Paul Baccas reviews Bruce Schneier's latest thought-provoking book, 'Click Here to Kill Everybody'.

We have placed cookies on your device in order to improve the functionality of this site, as outlined in our cookies policy. However, you may delete and block all cookies from this site and your use of the site will be unaffected. By continuing to browse this site, you are agreeing to Virus Bulletin's use of data as outlined in our privacy policy.