DroidKungFu command and control server may be mobile device

Posted by   Virus Bulletin on   Jun 20, 2011

Android trojan makes use of root exploit.

Researchers at Fortinet have discovered a command and control server for the 'DroidKungFu' Android trojan that appears to be a mobile device itself.

While malware for mobile devices has become more prevalent in recent months, it is believed attacks are still carried out from static computers and servers. However, a server that DroidKungFu reports back to appears to be a mobile device on the network of a major Chinese telecoms operator, that at the very least runs a web and an ssh server. Still, as Fortinet's Axelle Apvrille writes in her blog post, the relatively poor connection of mobile devices makes it less likely for them to act as a server.

The trojan targets devices running Android, Google's mobile operating system. It uses a two-part infection method: first it makes use of a root exploit to gain root access and then it installs the actual trojan. It calls itself 'Google SSearch' and posts information about the device to a remote server.

More can be found at Fortinet's blog here, with an analysis of the trojan at F-Secure's blog here.

Axelle Apvrille will present 'An OpenBTS GSM replication jail for mobile malware' at VB2011, 5-7 October in Barcelona, Spain. Register for the conference now.

Posted on 20 June 2011 by Virus Bulletin

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