Google AdWords phishing campaign spreads

Posted by   Virus Bulletin on   Oct 13, 2011

Users urged to login because of 'issues'.

A new phishing campaign that targets users of Google AdWords looks worryingly real, GFI reports.

The phish begins with an email claiming the recipient's Google ads have stopped running because of 'a number of issues'. A link in the email can be clicked for more information, which sends the user to a fake, but realistic-looking Google login page.

When (any) login credentials are filled in, the user is redirected to a page of AdWords FAQs that seems related to the issue referred to in the email. (Note that this page can be viewed without the need to be logged in to Google.)

While experienced users are unlikely to fall for such a scam - they will know not to click links in emails and will notice that the domain 'google-lft dot com' is not Google's - this scam is rather well executed and may see some victims falling for it. It is not hard to imagine how login credentials to the affiliate advertisement program can be monetized.

The domain google-lft dot com was registered at an Australian ISP by one Eric Polaski, who recently also registered domains such as paypal-ail dot com and paypal-frd dot com, which seem unlikely to have a legitimate purpose. It was still active at time of writing but Virus Bulletin has notified the ISP.

More at GFI here.

Posted on 13 October 2011 by Virus Bulletin

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