Spam catch rates drop in latest VBSpam test

Catch rates significantly lower than in previous months.

In the latest VBSpam comparative test, 20 solutions achieved a VBSpam award, but the majority displayed significantly lower spam catch rates than in other recent tests.

Overall, products' spam catch rates were significantly lower than in previous months, with many products seeing their rates of missed spam doubled. This is a worrying trend: many reports have indicated that global spam levels have dropped significantly in the past year. But if the performance of spam filters also drops, there is little net gain for the end-user, who will still regularly see their inbox filled with spam.

The drop in spam catch rates was most significant at the perimeter, suggesting that spammers are doing a better job at avoiding blacklists. It is possible that spammers are increasingly using legitimate services to send their messages, which poses new challenges for anti-spam companies.

There was good news for one product this month, though - Libra Esva blocked 99.97% of all spam messages without blocking any legitimate mail, and as such was the only product to obtain the new 'VBSpam+' award (to qualify for the VBSpam+ award, products must achieve a spam catch rate that is higher than 99.5% and a zero false positive rate).

For Virus Bulletin subscribers the full test report is available here. Non-subscribers can purchase the standalone review ($19.95) here.

More on the VBSpam tests, including historical performance of the participating products, can be found here.

Posted on 19 March 2012 by Virus Bulletin

twitter.png
fb.png
linkedin.png
googleplus.png
reddit.png

 

Latest posts:

VB2015 paper: Sizing cybercrime: incidents and accidents, hints and allegations

Cybercrime is big. But how big is it really? In a paper presented at VB2015 and together with the presentation video published on our website today, ESET researcher Stephen Cobb looks at previous studies that attempt the size of cybercrime and asks…

Throwback Thursday: The Thin Blue Line

This Throwback Thursday, VB heads back to 1994 when UK Fraud Squad detectives started making inroads into the most puzzling 'Whodunnit' since the Great Train Robbery. Had an outbreak of computer crime swept Britain? No, it was all part of a police…

Welcome to virusbulletin.com

Almost 20 years after Virus Bulletin revealed its first site on the "world wide web", we've redesigned our whole website. And we have a new domain as well.

VB2015 video: TurlaSat: The Fault in our Stars

In a presentation at VB2015 in Prague, Kaspersky Lab researcher Kurt Baumgartner talked about Turla's extraplanetary activities: the malware used (and abused) satellite Internet connections for command and control communication.

Security vendors should embrace those hunting bugs in their products

When interviewed by the Risky Business podcast last week, VB Editor Martijn Grooten talked about the security of security products and said that many vendors are embracing the work done by Tavis Ormandy and others - as they should.