Android malware hides inside JPG image

Posted by   Virus Bulletin on   Apr 4, 2012

New LeNa variant no longer depends on rooted devices.

Researchers at Lookout have discovered a new version of the 'LeNa' trojan for Android that does not require user interaction to gain root access to the device.

A previous version of the trojan, which was detected last summer, depended on the device being rooted; a minority of mostly technically adept users have done this to overcome limitations imposed by hardware manufacturers. The new variant of the malware uses the 'Gingerbreak' exploit to gain root access, which means that all unpatched devices (running versions prior to 2.3.4) are at risk.

The malware uses two binaries that hide inside a functional JPG image, where they are stored after the end of the image marker. One of the binaries uses the exploit to gain root access and install the other, which is the updated version of LeNa.

So far, the malware has only been detected at unofficial marketplaces and not at Google Play (the new name for the official Android marketplace). However, as it is packed with a genuine copy of the popular Angry Birds Space game, many users may still be tricked into installing it.

More at Lookout's blog here.

How does your organisation deal with the growing malware threat? At the VB seminar Trend Micro's David Sancho will talk about The evolution and future of the mobile threat.

The VB seminar takes place 19 April 2012 at the OU Campus in Milton Keynes, UK.

Posted on 4 April 2012 by Virus Bulletin

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