FBI warns against malware installed via hotel networks

Posted by   Virus Bulletin on   May 9, 2012

Malware poses as fake update of popular software.

The FBI has warned travellers against fake software updates served through hotel connections which actually attempt to install malware.

The agency reports that it has seen instances where travellers connecting to a hotel room's Internet connection are presented with a pop-up of what looks like an update to a popular software product. If the 'update' is accepted, however, malware is installed on the victim's computer. The FBI does not specify the type of malware installed or the motives behind the installation.

A reliable Internet connection is essential for many business travellers, but care should be taken not to compromise on security: make sure all important information is sent over secure HTTP or VPN and treat every alert - even those that look familiar - with extreme caution.

Though the FBI explicitly warns those travelling 'abroad', there is no reason why this couldn't happen in the United States. Hotel Internet networks are not always as well secured as they should be. A recent case where JavaScript was inserted into websites visited via a hotel Wi-Fi to push (harmless) advertisements will have done little to reassure visitors.

The full warning can be found at the website of the FBI's Internet Crime Complaint Center (ISC3) here.

Posted on 09 May 2012 by Virus Bulletin

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