Grum botnet's command-and-control servers shut down

Posted by   Virus Bulletin on   Jul 19, 2012

Spam-sending botnet believed to be third largest in the world.

International co-operation between a number of parties has led to all command-and-control servers of the 'Grum' botnet being taken down.

The takedown gives a good insight into how these operations work, and how co-operation is essential:

During the weekend, two command-and-control servers, based in the Netherlands and Panama, were taken down, leaving the botnet to depend on a single server located in Russia. However, the botherders responded quickly and started using a second server located in the Ukraine. (Even more than Russia, Ukraine has a reputation of being a safe haven for cybercriminal activities.)

Quick action by a number of organizations and individuals, including FireEye, Spamhaus and Russia-based CERT-GIB, helped to provide the hosting ISPs with evidence of what the servers were being used for. This then led to the shutdown of all remaining command-and-control servers on 18 July.

Grum has long had a reputation for sending vast amounts of spam. According to data from Spamhaus, some 120,000 different IP addresses were sending spam every day. Because many infected machines are likely to be located behind firewalls that block outbound SMTP connections, the total number of infections is probably much higher than this.

Writing on his company's blog, FireEye's Atif Mushtaq says that the main lesson he learned from this takedown is that there are no safe havens for cybercriminals any longer. For the fight against cybercrime this is, of course, a good thing.

More at FireEye's blog here, with an earlier story, focusing on the Dutch authorities' successful efforts to take down the Dutch command-and-control server, at Threatpost here.

Posted on 19 July 2012 by Virus Bulletin

twitter.png
fb.png
linkedin.png
hackernews.png
reddit.png

 

Latest posts:

VB2018 paper: From Hacking Team to hacked team to…?

Today we publish the VB2018 paper and video by ESET researcher Filip Kafka, who looked at the new malware by Hacking Team, after the company had recovered from the 2015 breach.

The spam that is hardest to block is often the most damaging

We see a lot of spam in the VBSpam test lab, and we also see how well such emails are being blocked by email security products. Worryingly, it is often the emails with a malicious attachment or a phishing link that are most likely to be missed.

Throwback Thursday: We're all doomed

Mydoom turns 15 this month, and is still being seen in email attachments. This Throwback Thursday we look back to March 2004, when Gabor Szappanos tracked the rise of W32/Mydoom.

VB2019 call for papers - now open!

Have you analysed a new online threat? Do you know a new way to defend against such threats? Are you tasked with securing systems and fending off attacks? The call for papers for VB2019 is now open and we want to hear from you!

VB2018 paper: Unpacking the packed unpacker: reversing an Android anti-analysis library

Today, we publish a VB2018 paper by Google researcher Maddie Stone in which she looks at one of the most interesting anti-analysis native libraries in the Android ecosystem. We also release the recording of Maddie's presentation.

We have placed cookies on your device in order to improve the functionality of this site, as outlined in our cookies policy. However, you may delete and block all cookies from this site and your use of the site will be unaffected. By continuing to browse this site, you are agreeing to Virus Bulletin's use of data as outlined in our privacy policy.