Cat carries computer virus

Posted by   Virus Bulletin on   Jan 9, 2013

Cat collared.

Japanese police have captured a cat said to be carrying a computer virus on a memory card attached to its collar. The bizarre 'arrest' came after various Japanese media organizations were sent anonymous emails containing a series of riddles apparently designed to lead to the memory card - which is reported to contain iesys.exe, or the 'remote control virus'.

The person responsible for the emails is also believed to have been behind a series of disturbing terrorist threats sent last year by email and posted to a popular Japanese discussion board. Japanese authorities have offered a 3 million Japanese yen (GBP21,400) reward for the capture of the criminal.

Felines certainly appear to be the criminal accessory du jour in 2013 - a Brazilian cat also made the news this week after having been apprehended in the grounds of a prison with contraband goods strapped to its body.

AFP has more details of how the Japanese cat was collared here.

Posted on 09 January 2013 by Helen Martin

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