Drop reported in infected computers worldwide

Posted by   Virus Bulletin on   Feb 6, 2013

Nearly one third of computers still found to be infected.

The proportion of infected computers worldwide decreased from 38.49% in 2011 to 31.98% last year, according to an annual security report from PandaLabs.

In the report, China tops the list of countries with the most infections in 2012 (54.89% of machines infected), followed by South Korea (54.15%), and Taiwan (42.14%).

Meanwhile, Sweden, Switzerland and Norway earn the altogether more appealing accolade of being the three least infected countries (with 20.25%, 20.35% and 21.03% of machines infected, respectively).

In terms of the types of malware causing infections, trojans top the bill with 76.56%. The number of trojan-infected computers has risen markedly over the last couple of years, the report suggesting that one of reason for this growth is the increased use of exploit kits such as Black Hole, which are capable of exploiting multiple system vulnerabilities to infect computers without user interaction.

The full report can be found here (PDF).

Posted on 06 February 2013 by Helen Martin

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