AMTSO unveils product setup check tools

Posted by   Virus Bulletin on   Jun 4, 2013

Set of checks can show if your security is properly configured and operational.

Today AMTSO officially released its 'Feature settings check' solutions, a set of simple tools to enable anyone to test whether their anti-malware solution is properly set up and working.

Hosted on the AMTSO website, the checks cover a range of standard anti-malware features, including protection against both manual and drive-by downloads, alerting on phishing pages, detection of 'potentially unwanted' software and proper connection to cloud lookup systems.

The checks are performed using specially crafted test files and pages, which the industry has agreed to include the proper detection for in their products. These include the long-standing EICAR test file, but also some newer items developed specially for the AMTSO check tools.

At the initial launch the checks are supported by many leading anti-malware vendors, including Agnitum, Avast, AVG, Avira, ESET, F-Secure, G Data, K7, Kaspersky, McAfee, Norman, Panda, Sophos, Symantec and Trend Micro. Other vendors are expected to join in soon. Not all vendors support all the checks, depending on the features implemented in their products.

The full set of checks can be accessed here, with details of which vendors support each check listed on the individual check pages.

Posted on 04 June 2013 by John Hawes

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