Paper: Windows 10 patching process may leave enterprises vulnerable to zero-day attacks

Posted by   Virus Bulletin on   Mar 12, 2015

Aryeh Goretsky gives advice on how to adapt to Windows 10's patching strategy.

Patching is hard, especially when the code base is old and the bugs are buried deeply. This was highlighted once again this week when Microsoft released a patch for a vulnerability that was thought to have been patched almost five years ago, but which could still be exploited.

In fact, six out of the last eight Patch Tuesdays have included patches that have caused problems for some Windows users.

Probably in response to this reality, Microsoft has announced a slightly different approach to patching for its upcoming Windows 10 operating systems. The changes include a new Long Term Servicing (LTS) branch, as well as the use of 'fast' and 'slow' release cycles.

Today, we publish an article by ESET researcher Aryeh Goretsky, who takes a close look at these changes and their consequences for Windows 10 users. He also gives some recommendations on how to adapt to this new patching strategy.

  Windows 10 Enterprise Technical Preview Build 9926 showing 'fast' and 'slow' release channels.

You can read the paper here in HTML format or here as a PDF. Remember that all content published by Virus Bulletin can be read free of charge, with no registration required.

Have you looked at the (in?)security of Windows 10? Why not submit an abstract for VB2015? The call for papers closes tomorrow (13th March).

Posted on 12 March 2015 by Martijn Grooten

twitter.png
fb.png
linkedin.png
googleplus.png
reddit.png

 

Latest posts:

A crime against statistics that is probably worse than the cyber attacks faced in County Durham

A report on the number of cyber attacks faced by UK local authorities is a good example of how the large numbers seen in many reports on security are rather meaningless.

NCSC gives important advice on lateral movement

The UK's National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC) has provided helpful and practical advice on preventing and detecting lateral movement by an attacker within a network.

What kind of people attend Virus Bulletin conferences?

If you are considering submitting a proposal for a talk to VB2018 and you're not familiar with the event, you may find it useful to know what kind of people attend the conference.

Olympic Games target of malware, again

An unattributed malware attack has disrupted some computer systems of the 2018 Winter Olympics. In 1994, a computer virus also targeted the Winter Olympics.

There are lessons to be learned from government websites serving cryptocurrency miners

Thousands of websites, including many sites of government organisations in the UK, the US and Sweden, were recently found to have been serving a cryptocurrency miner. More interesting than the incident itself, though, are the lessons that can be…