VB2015: some important information

Posted by   Virus Bulletin on   Aug 28, 2015

Last-minute papers, steganography competition and foosball tournament.

We're just a little over a month away from the beginning of VB2015, the 25th Virus Bulletin International Conference. If you haven't already registered, why not do so now?

Whether you have already registered or are thinking of doing so, there are some important things that are worth knowing about the event.

Call for last-minute papers

First, there is the call for last-minute papers. The ten slots set aside in the programme for 'last-minute' papers are indended for talks on current and emerging ('hot') topics. We are now seeking proposals for those speaking sessions.

The deadline for last-minute paper proposals is Thursday 3 September. The selection committee will act very quickly and we plan to let those selected know on the morning (European time) of Tuesday 8 September (a little more than three weeks before the start of the event).

Those selected are asked to give a 30-minute talk on Thursday 1 October — since these sessions are chosen so close to the event, we don't ask for a written paper for the last-minute presentations. We do, however, give speakers a free ticket for the conference!

Steganoprague

If you've already registered for the conference and you like a bit of a puzzle, do have a look at 'Steganoprague': a two-part competition involving steganography, the first part of which is played prior to the conference. The competition is open to individuals and/or teams, but to be in the running for the prize, competitors must be registered delegates of VB2015.

  Charles Bridge in Prague, the image used as a basis for the "Steganoprague" puzzle. Photo by Valerii Tkachenko, from Wikimedia Commons, released under the CC-BY-2.0 licence.

Foosball

Perhaps your idea of having fun doesn't always include zeros and ones — in which case you might want to enter into the hotly contended VB2015 foosball (table football) tournament, hosted by G Data. The matches promise to be exciting, closely fought and adrenaline-filled and will stretch the teams to their technical and mental limits!

Programme

Regardless of whether you submit a last-minute paper, take part in the competition or form a foosball team, we hope you'll join us in Prague. After all, besides all the fringe events, the programme — which includes 38 papers on a wide range of security topics, from drones to elephants — is no doubt the best advertisement for the conference. But should you need to convince your budget holder, we have put together a list of reasons to attend on a separate page.

Make sure you follow us on Twitter or Facebook for the latest updates or email us at conference@virusbtn.com if you have any questions.

We look forward to seeing you in Prague!



Posted on 28 August 2015 by Martijn Grooten
twitter.png
fb.png
linkedin.png
googleplus.png
reddit.png

 

Latest posts:

NCSC gives important advice on lateral movement

The UK's National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC) has provided helpful and practical advice on preventing and detecting lateral movement by an attacker within a network.

What kind of people attend Virus Bulletin conferences?

If you are considering submitting a proposal for a talk to VB2018 and you're not familiar with the event, you may find it useful to know what kind of people attend the conference.

Olympic Games target of malware, again

An unattributed malware attack has disrupted some computer systems of the 2018 Winter Olympics. In 1994, a computer virus also targeted the Winter Olympics.

There are lessons to be learned from government websites serving cryptocurrency miners

Thousands of websites, including many sites of government organisations in the UK, the US and Sweden, were recently found to have been serving a cryptocurrency miner. More interesting than the incident itself, though, are the lessons that can be…

We need to continue the debate on the ethics and perils of publishing security research

An article by security researcher Collin Anderson reopens the debate on whether publishing threat analyses is always in the public interest.