Throwback Thursday: Legal attempts to reduce spam. A UK perspective

Posted by   Virus Bulletin on   Nov 19, 2015

This Throwback Thursday, we turn the clock back to November 2003, when spam was such a hot topic that VB decided to launch a dedicated 'VB Spam Supplement'.

While, today, spam is a problem that is generally very well mitigated, 12 years ago it was a subject of growing concern and was becoming of increasing interest to the AV industry, with a veritable stampede of AV vendors rushing to bring anti-spam solutions to market alongside their anti-virus products.

With volumes of unsolicited email growing almost by the day, there was great interest in the ways in which users were affected by it, so in November 2003, VB decided to launch the 'VB Spam Supplement', a section of Virus Bulletin magazine that would be dedicated to news and articles on spam and anti-spam techniques.

In the first edition of the VB Spam Supplement, we heard that the ratio of spam to non-spam messages had recently exceeded the 50% mark — representing a huge 40.6% increase over the preceding 12 months. Meanwhile, in the first Spam Supplement feature, anti-spam software engineer Martin Lee summarized from a UK perspective the various legislative attempts to ban the abuse of email by law, concluding that, while legislation can assist in identifying clearly what is and what is not acceptable, "ultimately, while there is money to be made through the sending of spam, this is not a problem that is going to go away any time soon".

Martin Lee's article can be read here in HTML-format, or downloaded here as a PDF.

Posted on 19 November 2015 by Helen Martin

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