VB2015 video: Making a dent in Russian mobile banking phishing

Posted by   Virus Bulletin on   Dec 16, 2015

Sebastian Porst explains what Google has done to protect users from phishing apps targeting Russian banks.

In the last few years, mobile malware has evolved from a mostly theoretical threat to a very serious one that affects many users. Indeed, several talks at VB2015 dealt with various aspects of mobile security in general and that of the widely used Android operating system in particular.

No company has as deep an insight into Android malware as Google, which develops the operating system. In a last-minute presentation, Sebastian Porst, from the Android Security Team, explained what the company does to combat 'potentially harmful applications', as it calls them, and in particular what it did in a number of phishing apps that targeted Russian banks.

We have uploaded Sebastian's presentation to our YouTube channel. Other VB2015 papers and presentations will follow shortly.



Posted on 16 December 2015 by Martijn Grooten
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