VB2016 Call for Papers Deadline

Posted by   Martijn Grooten on   Mar 18, 2016

If you read our blog or follow us on social media, you can't have missed the fact that the deadline for submissions for VB2016 is 18 March. That's today!

If you haven't submitted a proposal yet, it's not too late — you can read the call for papers here or go directly to the abstract submission page here. Or, if you still have some questions about the CFP, you can find answers to those in a set of FAQs we posted last week.

The VB conference is known for its strict adherence to deadlines, which helps us run the programme on time. We follow the same principle when it comes to paper submission deadlines, but in this case we are a fraction more lenient: the call for papers won't close until 7am GMT on Monday (21st March), thus giving you the chance to make changes to your submission during the weekend should you need to.

We have already received lots of interesting submissions, so it won't suffice for your proposal just to be good: it actually has to be better than most of the others to convince the selection committee.

As in previous years, there will be a call for last-minute papers later in the year, but this really focuses on hot, last-minute research.

We plan to publish the programme in the first week of April, which is when we'll also open registrations.

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