VB2015 paper: Economic Sanctions on Malware

Posted by   Helen Martin on   Jun 1, 2016

Financial pressure can be a proactive and potentially very effective tool in making our computer ecosystems safer: making attackers spend real money before they can deploy malware is an effective deterrent. 

In his VB2015 paper, Igor Muttik analyses and gives examples of technologies (certificates, credentials, etc.) that can be used to de-incentivize bad behaviours in several ecosystems.

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The spectrum of technologies in the arsenal of AV products from the perspective of how they affect the costs for attackers

In his paper, Igor show how, by cleverly employing various trust metrics and technologies such as digital signing, watermarking, and public-key infrastructure in strategically selected places, we can encourage good behaviours and punish bad ones.

Read the paper here in HTML format or here as a PDF, and find the video on our YouTube channel, or embedded below.

Together with Jorge Blasco (London City University) and Markus Roggenbach (Swansea University), Igor is also on the VB2016 programme, where he and his co-authors will present a paper on wild Android collusions. If you register for VB2016 before the end of this month, you will receive a 10% discount.

Jorge Blasco

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