Throwback Thursday: You Are the Weakest Link, Goodbye!

Posted by   Helen Martin on   Jul 7, 2016

A recent survey by mobile ID provider TeleSign revealed that 72% of security professionals believe that passwords will be phased out by 2025 - in favour of behavioural biometrics and two-factor authentication.

Passwords have long been a weak point in the security chain, despite efforts to encourage users to pick strong ones. 13 years ago, Martin Overton wrote an article highlighting the weakness and explaining why it is the human element that presents the biggest risk to computer security - something that rings as true today as it did 13 years ago.

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Even back in 2003, Martin suggested ditching passwords in favour of technologies such as biometrics, smartcards and tokens, and we have seen the adoption of such technologies in several areas. Passwords are still widely used (and abused) though, and whether we will be a password-less society by 2025 remains to be seen.

Martin's article can be read here in HTML-format, or downloaded here as a PDF.

 

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