A Christmas present for the security community

Posted by   Martijn Grooten on   Dec 24, 2016

A botnet of Internet-connected cameras causing the largest DDoS ever; the ransomware threat that appears to get worse every day; a state-sponsored hacker group that attempted to influence a foreign election. 2016 has been quite a year for computer security.

But that's only half of the story. 2016 also saw many researchers analysing the threats, many vendors building products to mitigate them, and many collaborative efforts to improve security for everyone.

It is this latter part that we tend to focus on at Virus Bulletin, and while we don't know what 2017 will have in store for security, we can at least be certain that these attempts to make the world more secure will continue. As we have done for the past 27 years, we will continue to report on these trends, to check whether security products live up to the claims their developers make about them, and to facilitate the research done by great researchers from around the world.

To encourage that research, and as a Christmas present for the security community, we have uploaded all remaining papers and videos from the VB2015 conference, which took place in Prague almost 15 months ago. You can find them all linked from the VB2015 programme.

(Please note: not all presentations were filmed and not all presentations included a written paper; moreover in a few instances, we were asked not to publish the papers and videos. Some papers are available as a HTML page, while others are available in PDF.)

 

The VB team wish you happy holidays and all the best for 2017! See you in Madrid!

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