Throwback Thursday: Adjust Your Attitude!

Posted by   Helen Martin on   Dec 15, 2016

At the VB2016 conference in Denver earlier this year, ESET researcher Stephen Cobb spoke about the cybersecurity skills shortage, providing an overview of existing efforts to assess cyber-aptitude and ability, and looking at the results of a number of experimental fast-track cybersecurity training programmes. He also reviewed the scant existing studies of the personality traits of information security defenders.

Sixteen years ago, it was James Wolfe, at the time Chief Security Engineer at Lockheed Martin Corporation, who was calling for fellow security admins, working to protect their organization's networks and data, to enhance their skill sets - specifically to work on their people skills.

Throwback-Thursday-VB.jpg

In his article, Wolfe urged security experts to sell themselves and their services, warning, "Not getting the funding and the staff you want might not be the problem. You might be the problem."

Read James Wolfe's opinion piece here in HTML-format, or downloaded here as a PDF.

Read Stephen Cobb's VB2016 paper here (or download here as a PDF).

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